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WMI LOAN IMPACT: 2014

WMI Loan Program ImpactEach year WMI surveys borrowers to collect data on program impact. In 2014, WMI's college interns analyzed data from loan program participants throughout East Africa to assess how the loans are empowering rural women and improving household living standards. The results continue to be impressive!

Uganda

Income: Prior to entering the loan program, only 46% of borrower households had income of over approximately $500 annually. After 18 months in the WMI loan program, 90% of borrowers had income of over approximately $500 annually. Through the WMI program, the number of households earning over $500 annually nearly doubled.

Savings: Prior to entering the loan program, only 9% of borrower households had over approximately $60 in annual savings. After 18 months in the loan program, 63% of borrowers had over approximately $130 in annual savings. Through the WMI program, the number of households with at least $60 in annual savings increased by 600%.

Tanzania

Income: Prior to entering the loan program, only 18% of borrower households had income of over approximately $200 annually. After 12 months in the WMI loan program, 90% of borrowers made over $250 annually. Through the WMI program, the number of households earning over $200 annually increased by over 350%.

Savings: Prior to entering the loan program, 34% of borrower households had no savings at all and only 5% saved over $100 annually. After 12 months in the WMI loan program, 94% of borrower households saved some money and 82% of borrower households saved over $132 each year. Through the WMI program, the number of households with over $100 in annual savings increased by over 1600%.

Kenya

Income: Prior to entering the loan program, over 50% of borrower households had less than $150 in annual income, while only 2% had annual income of over $1,000. After 12 months in the WMI loan program, the percentage of borrowers with less than $150 in annual income decreased to 20%, while more than 20% of borrowers had annual income of over $1,000. Households earning less than $150 annually reduced by 150% and households earning over $1000 annually increased by 900%.

Savings: Prior to entering the loan program, 34% of borrower households had no savings at all, while only 14% of borrower households saved over $50 annually. After 12 months in the WMI loan program, 77% of borrower households saved over $60 annually. Through the WMI program, the number of households with over $50 in annual savings increased by over 400%.


UGANDA UGANDA
In Eastern Uganda, where the WMI loan program was launched in 2008, it continues to have significant impact in improving the economic well-being of borrowers and their families. Data analyzed in the 2014 Eastern Uganda Factbook followed the progress of 100 women over the four, consecutive six-month loan cycles. 2014 Northern Uganda Factbook and the 2014 Southwestern Uganda Factbook also reflect significant household gains and improvements.

TANZANIA

TANZANIA
Launched in 2012, the WMI loan program in Tanzania serves extremely marginalized Maasai women living on the high plateau bordering the Ngorongoro Crater. Farming of non-indigenous crops (such as the typical staples of beans and maize) is prohibited. Water must be trucked into the village and traditional domestic herds of goats and cattle compete for limited scrub vegetation. The loan program additionally serves women living in villages surrounding the town of Karatu, about 50 miles from the Crater. Despite numerous challenges, the 2014 Tanzania Factbook reflects that the women have significantly improved their household living conditions through the businesses they have launched and successfully managed.

Atiak

KENYA
In Kenya, the loan program is serving several small villages. We asked women to give us their personal reflections on the loan program. Responses of how the loan program is improving life in their villages are contained in the 2014 Borrower Narratives - Kenya.